Kaine downplays chances of abolishing Electoral College

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) -- U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine has endured the pain of winning the popular vote but losing the Electoral College, which denied him the vice presidency.

But the Virginia Democrat on Monday downplayed the prospects of abolishing the Electoral College.

Speaking at the University of Louisville, Kaine flatly said that getting rid of the Electoral College isn't going to happen because it would require a constitutional change. He said the proposal couldn't overcome the "really onerous requirement" of being ratified by an overwhelming majority of states. He says smaller states "really like" the Electoral College.

The idea has gained traction among Democrats, since Hillary Clinton netted nearly 3 million more votes in 2016 than Republican Donald Trump, yet lost the Electoral College and therefore the White House. Kaine was Clinton's running mate.