Undecided voters could make the difference in Wisconsin senate race

Polls forecast there are enough undecided voters to swing the race either way.
Published: Nov. 8, 2022 at 1:59 PM EST
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WASHINGTON (Gray DC) - A recent poll shows Senator Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.) pulling ahead of his challenger Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes (D-Wisc.) in Wisconsin’s Senate race.

With a 50-50 split in the U.S. Senate, this race could be one of the best chances Democrats have at flipping a seat. That makes it crucial for Republicans to hold on to, according to election analysts.

President Joe Biden is promising to codify Roe vs. Wade if more Democrats are voted into Congress during the mid-terms.

The make-up of the Senate is crucial to getting that done.

In Wisconsin’s closely watched Senate race, Barnes hopes pushing the issue of abortion access will help him defeat Johnson.

“The reality is that Sen. Johnson has taken an extreme position that women have to make about their own healthcare,” said Rhett Buttle.

While reproductive rights is a concern, Buttle along with political analyst Katie Wonnenberg both agree kitchen table issues such as inflation are what’s directly impacting voters right now.

“There’s a lot that is happening, and I don’t want to diminish the importance of reproductive health in any of these races or for voters, but I do think at the end of the day a lot of people are going what are they facing right now,” said Wonnenberg.

In recent months, Johnson has gained a narrow lead over Barnes in polls following a release of attack ads including one accusing Barnes of being soft on crime.

When it comes down to it, Wonnenberg says the outcome of how Wisconsin voters voted in the 2020 presidential election maybe on Barnes’ side.

“Joe Biden won Wisconsin,” said Wonnenberg. “So, I think there’s a lot of hope that going into it that Lt. Governor Barnes would be able to pull it off.”

If he wins, this would be a third term for Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.). He originally pledged to only serve two terms in the U.S. Senate.